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dc.contributor.authorKrivokapić, Danilo
dc.contributor.authorPerkov, Bojan
dc.contributor.authorMarko, Davor
dc.date.accessioned2020-07-10T15:12:53Z
dc.date.available2020-07-10T15:12:53Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.urihttp://doi.org/20.500.11825/1622
dc.description.abstractThe COVID-19 pandemic caused many shockwaves globally, eg disruption to daily interaction (physical and social distancing measures), disruption to education, disruption to work, restrictions on freedom of movement, etc. But, particular concern has been raised for the respect of human rights during this global public health crisis. Countries across the world have introduced various legal measures and technological solutions to combat consequences of COVID-19, leading to increased intrusion into their citizens’ lives. In such circumstances, privacy and personal data protection were among the first ‘victims’, while infringement of other rights, such as freedom of expression and information, came soon after. The Western Balkans are no exception – numerous breaches of digital rights and freedoms could be witnessed during the pandemic, threatening to further decrease the overall state of human rights riding on the public fear of a major health crisis. The purpose of this paper is to show that the pandemic should not under any circumstances be used as a carte blanche for irreversible reduction of human rights standards, especially through the use of intrusive technologies. The authors’ findings presented in the paper highlight that there are already many issues in the Western Balkans in terms of digital rights and freedoms, particularly concerning personal data privacy and security, misinformation and attacks on journalists, which only deteriorated during the COVID-19 pandemic.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherGlobal Campus of Human Rightsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesPolicy Briefs 2020;
dc.subjectcrisis managementen_US
dc.subjectCOVID-19en_US
dc.subjectpublic healthen_US
dc.subjecteducationen_US
dc.subjectworken_US
dc.subjecthuman rightsen_US
dc.subjectfreedom of movementen_US
dc.subjectprivacyen_US
dc.subjectright to privacyen_US
dc.subjectdata protectionen_US
dc.subjectWestern Balkansen_US
dc.titleState of pandemonium: Digital rights in the Western Balkans and COVID-19en_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US


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  • 01. Global Campus Policy Briefs
    The Global Campus Policy Observatory is a 'virtual hub' which comprehends a team of seven researches from the regional programmes to produce, publish and publicly present seven different policy analyses in form of policy briefs, with the aim of making of each regional programme a solid focal point for policy expert advisory in human rights issues.

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