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dc.contributor.authorLamer, Wiebke
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-23T13:15:14Z
dc.date.available2018-07-23T13:15:14Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/20.500.11825/628
dc.description.abstractThis paper outlines current information-related dangers of the digital age that are undermining democracy and human rights both in Europe and on a global scale. In particular, it focuses on three related trends: the weaponisation of information, truth decay, and information disorder. This paper highlights the key importance of press freedom and independent media for democratic societies in countering these dangers. It examines policy options for addressing these trends, which in a wider perspective signal a turn towards illiberalism and authoritarianism, stressing the complexity of the problem and that of the needed solutions. It argues that instead of being primarily concerned with quick fixes such as media regulation and installing fact-checking mechanisms, policymakers should invest in long-term approaches that include support for media development, media literacy and public diplomacy to counter these information-related trends. First and foremost, it recommends that the EU and its member states devote more effort to protecting and promoting independent media and press freedom at home and abroad in order to strengthen democracy in light of these ongoing trends.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherGlobal Campusen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesPolicy Briefs 2018;
dc.subjectjournalismen_US
dc.subjectfreedom of expressionen_US
dc.subjectmediaen_US
dc.subjectpress and politicsen_US
dc.subjectfreedom of the pressen_US
dc.subjectpress lawen_US
dc.subjectinternet
dc.subjecttechnological innovations
dc.titleFostering independent journalism and press freedom to protect against information-related dangers of the digital ageen_US
dc.typeOtheren_US


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  • 01. Global Campus Policy Briefs
    The Global Campus Policy Observatory is a 'virtual hub' which comprehends a team of seven researches from the regional programmes to produce, publish and publicly present seven different policy analyses in form of policy briefs, with the aim of making of each regional programme a solid focal point for policy expert advisory in human rights issues.

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